UNDERGRADUATE TEACHING PRIZE

In 2014, SEASECS established a new Undergraduate Teaching Prize of $1000 to be awarded to the member or members who propose the best undergraduate panel for the conference, with the funds to be used at least in part to help the participating undergraduate students with expenses related to attending the conference. Submissions should consist of a letter from the SEASECS member(s) describing the panel, along with a one-page (maximum) talk proposal from each of the three or four undergraduate presenters. The deadline for submissions is November 15, 2016. Please send submissions as PDF files to Blake Gerard at wgerard@aum.edu.

2017 Winner: Mary Crone-Romanovski, Assistant Professor at Florida Gulf Coast University, who organized the panel "Cutural Encounters in Eighteenth-Century Castaway Tales." Panelists included: 

Elizabeth Feins, "Anti-Colonization in Gulliver's Travels"
Amanda Souchik, "Narrative Style in Castaway Tales: How The Female American Expands on Robinson Crusoe"
Jamie Kramer, "Transatlantic Hermitage: Creating Society through Solitude in The Female American"
Kelsey Abell, "The Malleable Missionary: Evangelism as an Alternative to Colonization in The Female American"

2016 Winner: Kirsten Saxon, Professor of English at Mills College, who organized the panel "Mind Over Matter: Gendered Bodies and Performative Texts." Panelists included:

Susana Fortu, "Pamela as Selfie: Female Textual Authority and Masculine Reinscription"
Margaret Miller, "'Your infatuation about that girl blinds you': (Miss)readings and Queer Narratology in Jane Austen's Emma"
Emma Wilson, "Pamela, or Welcome 2 My Mind: 18th-Century Epistolarity and Teen Girl Blogging Culture"
Savannah Stelzer, "Feints and Scribbles: Pamela as Creator of Self, Strategies, and Stories"

2015 Winner: Michael Rex, Associate Professor at Cumberland University. 

2014 Winner: Emily C. Friedman, Assistant Professor of English at Auburn University, who organized the panel "Revolutions in the Marketplace: Subverting Generic Expectations in Late Eighteenth-Century Culture."